fbpx

Tag: sobriety

13 Natural Ways to Manage Depression in Recovery

13 Natural Ways to Manage Depression in Recovery woman painting to reduce her stress

This podcast is all about sharing positive advice and wisdom for daily life in recovery. In this episode, I’m going to talk a little bit about depression, how it relates to addiction recovery, and 13 natural ways to find some relief.

Globally, more than 300 million people suffer from depression and it is the leading cause of disability worldwide. Depression can severely affect a person’s emotional and physical health, causing feelings of emptiness and sadness, insomnia, weight fluctuations, cognitive problems, fatigue, weakened immune system, and at its worst, suicide.

Most people in recovery are very familiar with the effects of depression because depression and substance abuse frequently co-exist. People often abuse drugs or alcohol to escape their sadness, but substance abuse can also cause depression. The cycle of depression and substance abuse often continues endlessly.

Many people turn to antidepressants to combat depression, however, prescription drugs may not always be the best choice for someone with a history of addiction. Fortunately, there are many “natural” non-medicated ways to combat depression if you’re in recovery.

Here are 13 natural ways to manage depression in recovery.
1. Establish and maintain a daily routine.
2. Set daily goals.
3. Volunteer.
4. Try aromatherapy.
5. Make some dietary changes.
6. Get moving.
7. Catch some rays.
8. Consider getting a pet.
9. Stay involved with your community support group.
10. Make music a part of your daily life.
11. Practice meditation or yoga for a few minutes each day.
12. Do something new.
13. Prioritize fun.

8 Hobbies That Can Reduce Anxiety

8 Hobbies That Can Reduce Anxiety woman painting to reduce her stress

This podcast is all about sharing positive advice and wisdom for daily life in recovery. In this episode, I’m going to share 8 hobbies that can help reduce anxiety.

Overall, researchers estimate that about 20 percent of people who suffer from addiction are also plagued by an anxiety disorder. Some studies estimate that this rate may even be as high as 50 percent among people who are suffering from trauma.

Unfortunately, anxiety doesn’t just disappear once you get sober. In fact, experiences in early recovery often cause an increase in anxiety, making it more difficult for people in recovery to stay sober. Running into old acquaintances who still use drugs, walking past a bar you used to go to frequently, being bored, or even just thinking about taking on a difficult day without a drink can cause feelings of anxiety to flare up.

Although anxiety may be a serious issue for you, there are several different hobbies that may help you develop a new sense of “normal” in your life as you adjust to sobriety.

#1. Playing a musical instrument
#2. Art and coloring
#3. Sports
#4. Gardening
#5. Yoga or Tai Chi
#6. Writing
#7. Knitting or Crocheting
#8. Volunteering with animals

10 Ways to Develop Resilience in Sobriety

10 Ways to Develop Resilience in Sobriety 10 Ways to Develop Resilience in Sobriety

This podcast is all about sharing positive advice and wisdom for daily life in recovery. In this episode, I’m going to share 10 ways you can work to develop resilience in a life of sobriety.

First of all, making the transition from addiction into a sober lifestyle requires hard work, life skills, and the ability to cope with challenges as they arise. After completing rehab, you might find yourself struggling to overcome certain setbacks that make it difficult to stay sober. This can lead to overwhelming feelings of anxiety, depression, or even a full-blown relapse.

Often, relapse is a result of a lack of resilience; an essential skill for anyone in recovery. If you’re newly sober and you’re struggling to survive the day-to-day sober, taking steps to develop your resilience can help you learn how to cope and break free from the cycle of chronic relapse.

So, what is resilience then? Psych Central defines resilience as the ability to adapt to difficult circumstances or life events. In other words, if you are resilient, you can bounce back and recover from challenging life circumstances like addiction, trauma, or financial problems. Instead of getting stuck in a bad place, you’re able to move forward and learn from the experience.

There are lots of ways you can work to develop resilience in your daily life. Whether you’ve been sober for a few days, months, or several years, here are 10 ways you can develop resilience in your own life.

#1. Make sober connections.
#2. Start viewing challenges as an opportunity to improve.
#3. Accept that you don’t have control everything.
#4. Develop personal goals and take steps to work toward them daily.
#5. Take action.
#6. Actively seek opportunities for personal growth.
#7. Believe in yourself and your abilities.
#8. Maintain a level head.
#9. Practice self-care.
#10. Nurture spiritual practices.

7 Positive Things You Realize About Yourself When You Get Sober

7 Positive Things You Realize About Yourself When You Get Sober happy woman smiling outside

This podcast is all about sharing positive advice and wisdom for daily life in recovery. In this episode, I’m going to share 7 different positive things you realize about yourself when you get sober.

So, substance abuse and addiction can take a toll on the way others view us and the way we view ourselves. In fact, drug abuse itself is often a symptom of low-self esteem and self-hate. On the other hand, getting sober (and staying that way) is just as much a physical process as it is an emotional and psychological one. It’s no easy feat but the endeavor is truly a life-changing experience.

Many great things happen when you get sober and some of the best things aren’t necessarily tangible. Instead, they happen on the inside. If you are new to sobriety or you’re thinking about ditching the harmful substance abuse habits in your life, here are seven positive things you might realize about yourself when you get sober.

#1. You can trust yourself.
#2. You can be a morning person and be productive.
#3. You can cope.
#4. You have self-control.
#5. You can be a good friend.
#6. Good things can happen to you.
#7. You have interests and skills that you never knew about.

[IDEAS Series] Q&A with Nick Tolar, Director of Operations at Eudaimonia Recovery Homes

[IDEAS Series] Q&A with Nick Tolar, Director of Operations at Eudaimonia Recovery Homes IDEAS header

Nick Tolar is the Director of Operations at Eudaimonia Recovery Homes, the sister company of Nova Recovery Center. He oversees the general operations of our sober living homes in Austin by ensuring that all residents are held accountable and are given the tools they need to succeed in recovery.

“Sobriety” Author Daniel Maurer Talks 12 Steps and His Graphic Novel

“Sobriety” Author Daniel Maurer Talks 12 Steps and His Graphic Novel cover of sobriety a graphic novel

Daniel Maurer is an accomplished author who lives in Saint Paul, Minnesota with his wife, Carol, and two sons. His four books include “Faraway: A Suburban Boy’s Story as a Victim of Sex Trafficking”, “Papa Luther: A Graphic Novel”, “Endure: The Power of Spiritual Assets for Resilience to Trauma & Stress” and “Sobriety: A Graphic […]

Ready to Get Sober? 5 Reasons Not to Wait Until After the Holidays

Ready to Get Sober? 5 Reasons Not to Wait Until After the Holidays calendar

The holiday season is a joyous and eventful time that many people look forward to. If your addiction has reared it’s ugly head and you’re finally ready to get help, the thought of missing out on the holiday fun may be a major deterrent. Although it may be easier to shelve the idea of going […]

Why a Moral Inventory Should Be a Part of Your Sobriety

Why a Moral Inventory Should Be a Part of Your Sobriety Why a Moral Inventory Should Be a Part of Your Sobriety

What is a Moral Inventory? Step four of the 12-step program requires that individuals make a searching and fearless moral inventory of themselves.1,2 A moral inventory is a written objective assessment of your life, including character deficits, strengths and weaknesses, and an overarching look at the damage you’ve caused with your addiction.

Call Now Button