Heroin Addiction – What is Kratom

Heroin Addiction – The Drug Enforcement Administration announced Friday that Kratom will be classed with heroin, LSD, and marijuana as a Scheduled 1 Drug. Currently Kratom is considered a supplement by the FDA. Beginning September 30th it will be entered into the category with some of the most dangerous drugs on the planet. This ruling will last for the next three years, but could be extended permanently. Heroin Addiction has been a hot topic recently in the media and the FDA is looking to push all substances with abuse potential out from over the counter.

What is Kratom? The kratom tree leaves have been used for centuries as a herbal drug by farmers and laborers. Native to Southeast Asia, the “dietary supplement” is sold over the counter in smoke shops across the nation in powder and pill form. When taken at high dosages, kratom can act as an opioid like sedative, producing effects the dull pain. Mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine are the main ingredient in Kratom, and are the substances being strictly forbidden on the list of Scheduled 1 Substances.  Since 2014, fifteen people have died from the effects of the kratom plant. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) found that kratom abuse leads to agitation, irritability, tachycardia, nausea, drowsiness, and hypertension. Abusing the plant can lead to hepatotoxicity, psychosis, seizure, weight loss, insomnia, tachycardia, vomiting, poor concentration, hallucinations, and even death.

Some consider it just as a harmless plant. The reasoning behind the change is that kratom has a high potential for abuse. Currently kratom has no accepted medical use in treatment and lacks safety use under no medical supervision. These are the three factors that constitute a Schedule I controlled substance according to the Controlled Substances Act passed by Congress in 1970

Overcoming your addiction to drugs or alcohol will likely be one of the greatest challenges you’ll ever face. Addiction is a devastating, debilitating disease. Its fallout can be far-reaching and long lasting, with negative impacts on your life and the lives of everyone around you. Nova Recovery Center, a residential drug and alcohol treatment center, understands recovery is a continuous process. Our continuum of care, is specifically designed for the highest possible outcomes for long-term sobriety. Contacting Nova Recovery residential drug and alcohol treatment center is the first step to changing lives.

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Texas Drug Treatment – Highway to Heroin.

It has reached the highest levels in 20 years in the United States. The deadliest drug worldwide and its increasing use rate in America is alarming. There are about one million users of this deadly drug in the U.S as of 2014, which is almost three times higher than the number in the early 2000s. Overdose deaths related to this drug have increased five times since 2000. Of course were speaking about heroin. The heroin addiction epidemic kills more people than any other drug. Some of the leading experts believe that painkiller medications were being overprescribed and with the recent prescription drug crackdown, drugs like heroin skyrocketed in use.  Overdoses related to drugs like heroin average 120 people a day. September is known across the nation as National Recovery Month, were awareness around drug addiction is increased.Texas Drug Treatment like Nova Recovery Center can help those in need.

Earlier this year President Obama asked Congress for $1Billion in funding to address the opioid epidemic and prescription and heroin abuse. Shockingly, more Americans die every day from drug overdoses than they do in motor vehicle crashes.  With recent Pop Icons like Prince dying from the deadly disease of drug addiction, America can no long turn a blind eye to the problem at its doorstep. Nearly 10 million Americans used prescription opioids for nonmedical use in 2012. The National Institutes of Health reported Wednesday that abuse of prescription opioid painkillers in the U.S. has doubled in 10 years.

Injected, smoked or snorted, heroin reaches the brain through the bloodstream. Once there it connects with the opioid receptors which produces the high feeling. Addiction occurs when the users of the heroin drug repeatedly uses it. The users brain is high jacked by heroin. It becomes physically and mentally depended on the drug. In addition, the users need more and more of the drug to achieve the same high.

With repeated use, the dangers of an overdose become more real. The opioid epidemic in America is devastating, but actions can be taken to stop the epidemic. September is National Recovery Month. Here in Austin, TX organizations are holding events to honor and supports those effected by addiction.

Overcoming your addiction to drugs or alcohol will likely be one of the greatest challenges you’ll ever face. Addiction is a devastating, debilitating disease. Its fallout can be far-reaching and long lasting, with negative impacts on your life and the lives of everyone around you. Nova Recovery Center, a residential drug and alcohol treatment center, understands recovery is a continuous process. Our continuum of care, is specifically designed for the highest possible outcomes for long-term sobriety. Contacting Nova Recovery residential drug and alcohol treatment center is the first step to changing lives.

College Students and Drug Addiction: An IOP in Austin Can Benefit

It’s that time of year again to get ready to go back to school which means buying textbooks, binders, backpacks, and the list goes on. Soon students will be staying up late studying for exams, pulling all-nighters, alcohol and binge drinking and taking prescriptions drugs.

Commonly Abused Prescriptions on College Campuses

Painkillers such as Vicodin, Percocet or OxyContin, stimulants like Adderall, and depressants such as Xanax or Valium are the most commonly abused prescription drugs on college campuses. Prescription drug abuse in college can be a slippery slope. Many college students believe prescription medications are safer than street drugs because they’re prescribed by a doctor.  All medications have risks, they’re only safe when directed taken for the patient who they were prescribed for, misusing or abusing prescription medication is very dangerous, and can be fatal. This can lead to the downfall to a student’s performance in college and jeopardize a student’s future.

So then why do our future leaders partake in dangerous illegal drug use? Once away from home many students are subject to the temptations and demands of college life with parental supervision. While some students abuse prescription medications to feel good to get high, plenty of students abuse prescription medications to help manage their daily college lives. The additional stress and anxiety of exams is sometimes too much for some to handle. Drugs such as Adderall allow will boost their moods, allow them to stay up all night studying and even increase their stamina on the field. In the competitive atmosphere of college even the best and brightest can feel the pressure to fit in socially and excel academically. Around 1/3 of college students will abuse prescription drugs during their college career, and About 2 in 3 college students are offered prescription drugs by their senior year.

Why Do College Students Binge Drink?

Alcohol abuse has long been a serious problem on many college campuses. Four out of five college students will consume alcohol occasionally during their college careers. 40% of college students have admitted to binge drinking at least once within the past two weeks after taking a survey by the National Institutes of Health. Binge drinking is defined as drinking heavily over a short period of time with the intention of becoming very drunk.

The question of “Why college students indulged in heavy drinking” if difficult to answer. Yes, many students see it as the forbidden fruit, especially for those who are under the age of 21. It helps erase inhibitions and is seen as a way to get rid of the stress of college life. The college party scene also adds to the over consumption of alcohol. Students drink to numb the pain of failed relationships. No matter what the reason is, drinking and using prescriptions drugs is problematic for college students.

Overcoming Addiction

Overcoming your addiction to drugs or alcohol will likely be one of the greatest challenges you’ll ever face. Addiction is a devastating, debilitating disease. Its fallout can be far-reaching and long lasting, with negative impacts on your life and the lives of everyone around you. Nova Recovery Center, a residential drug and alcohol treatment center, understands recovery is a continuous process. Our continuum of care is specifically designed for the highest possible outcomes for long-term sobriety. Contacting Nova Recovery residential drug and alcohol treatment center and our IOP Austin program is the first step in making lasting change. Call 855.834.6682 to speak to an admissions representative today.

IOP Austin Program (Intensive Outpatient Program)

Nova Recovery Center’s Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP Austin Texas) provides a high level of addiction treatment and care ideal for those individuals and busy college students needing ongoing support as they transition from an inpatient care setting or for those who know they have to make a change, but cannot commit to a residential treatment program.

The full IOP Austin program lasts around 8 weeks. This time frame allows for consistency, accountability, and practice the many new skills that Nova Recovery Center’s IOP in Austin covers. A strong sober social support system is crucial for long term success.

Professional Quarterback Speaks About His Addiction to Opioid Painkillers

Opioid Painkiller addiction among athletes, especially professional football players, is often an unfortunate reality for those who make their living by pushing their bodies to the extreme. Careers are extended by the powerful effects of the opioid painkillers. Players misuses the prescription drugs to extend their careers season by season. Unfortunately, prolonging one’s career often means the development of opioid painkiller addiction. The problem has plagued the professional sports league for decades. A 2011 study from Washington University in St. Louis revealed that retired NFL players are four times more likely to misuse prescription opioids. This was the case for the three-time MVP Brett Favre. The future hall of famer was recently on the Graham Bensinger’s show last week and he opened talked about his addiction with opioid painkillers. “I took 15 Vicodin at one time,” Favre said. “Two gave me an effect I liked. After a month, two didn’t do anything, so I’d take three . . . and then four and so on. . I knew that 15 was hard to come by. A month’s prescription is 30 pills or something, depending on what they prescribe for you, and I was going through that in two days. I would ask this guy for pills and that guy for pills, after a while I was going back around pretty quickly.”

During the interview with Bensinger, Favre stated even though he knew how wrong it was, he liked the way it made him feel. After feeling he had hit rock bottom, he decided to go cold turkey to get over his addiction. “I’d hit rock bottom and I said, I’m going to flush these down the toilet. I remember when I poured them in the toilet and it started to flush, I almost crawled into the toilet to go after them because I thought, ‘What in the world did you do?’ I was so dependent on them,” he said. Favre did not consult a doctor to stop and instead just went cold turkey. He said the love for football really helped him get off the addiction. . Looking back on it, Favre wishes he had gone to a doctor for help, stating how he probably harmed himself by his own self-recovery. Favre said that was the worst month ever, he shook every night, cold sweats, it was a constant battle.

In his experience with drug addiction, Favre believes that playing football is what got him through the difficult time in his life. His interview is just one of the many stories that speak about the effects of drug addiction. The powerful opioid painkillers can affect anyone and everyone who takes them. Now having revealed to have overcome painkiller addiction speaks greater volumes to the mental makeup of one of the NFL’s greatest. No doubt his speech will be one of the most-anticipated.

Overcoming your addiction to drugs or alcohol will likely be one of the greatest challenges you’ll ever face. Addiction is a devastating, debilitating disease. Its fallout can be far-reaching and long lasting, with negative impacts on your life and the lives of everyone around you. Nova Recovery Center, a residential drug and alcohol treatment center, understands recovery is a continuous process. Our continuum of care, is specifically designed for the highest possible outcomes for long-term sobriety. Contacting Nova Recovery residential drug and alcohol treatment center is the first step to changing lives.

Parents Should Lock Their Medicine Cabinets

You may have heard some families are locking their medicine cabinet in their homes, and you may think that seems a bit ridiculous. If you haven’t gotten the memo yet, parents it’s time to clean out your medicine cabinets and lock prescription opioid painkillers away. Teen prescription drug abuse is becoming a serious problem in the United States today. According to the Partnership for a Drug-Free America: 1 in 5 teens has abused prescription pain medication. Adolescents are abusing these “safe” physician prescribed drugs more than heroin, methamphetamines, and cocaine. The White House Office of Nation Drug Control Policy has said that: Every day, 2,500 kids aged 12-17 abuse a prescription painkiller for the first time and more people are getting addicted to prescription drug abuse. Parents are supplying the drugs without even realizing it.

Prescription drugs are just as dangerous as the hardcore “street drugs”. The easy availably of prescription drugs have led to an increase of teens becoming addicted. These drugs can become very dangerous when combined with other drugs and can lead to harmful and fatal drug overdoses. Many teens are unaware of the potency of these prescribed medications and will most likely take random pills from different bottles. Many teens combine them because their parents are less likely to notice if one of two pills from several different prescription bottles are missing as opposed to many pills from the same prescription bottle.

Emergency rooms are seeing more teens coming in due to accidental overdose of prescription drugs. Some of the more commonly abused prescription drugs include prescription painkillers like Vicodin, and OxyContin. Other stimulants like medication for ADHD such as Ritalin or Adderall, and anti-anxiety medications such as Xanax and Valium can be abused. Many other types of prescription drugs are abused as well, including diet pills, mood stabilizers, antidepressants, and muscle relaxers,

As a loving parent you must take action in helping prevent your loved one or teenager from prescription drug abuse. One of the first places you can start is by making sure that all medications are monitored are stored in a locked cabinet. There may be situations that are out of your control and your teenagers friend may come looking into your medicine cabinet but ensuring the lock is set up, can prevent pills from going missing.

Nova Recovery Center provides affordable, customized drug and alcohol rehabilitation programs to individuals in any stage of addiction. Whether you are seeking help for the first time or struggling with recovery after repeated attempts, we will provide you with the insights, life skills and tools you need to commit to a new path leading to lifelong sobriety. Contact Nova Recovery Center Today at 855-969-3668 for more information.

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